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Digital Humanities, Mathematical Modelling of Cavalry Charge

Posted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 1:13 pm
by uneducated
There is an interesting paper by Michael Armstrong at Brock University which describes a mathematical model re-enactment of the Charge of the Light Brigade. (His modelling might be useful in other games too, since it is tried elsewhere with cruise missiles and the American Civil War.)

After the disastrous charge, people wished to allocate blame and there was much controversy. The modelling can lend quantifiable support to the many "what would have happened if..." scenarios. The study shows that, given Raglan's order to attack, Lucan's original decision, to charge with both the Light and Heavy brigade, was the "least bad" option and would have resulted in a bloody British victory, however, Lucan didn't follow through with his initial decision to support the Light with the Heavy, as on seeing the intensity of fire against the Light, he withheld the Heavy.

There is an article about it here:
https://theconversation.com/could-the-c ... rked-82801

I am grateful to the people of Taiwan for their open science initiative which allowed me access to the original paper without a paywall here:

https://sci-hub.tw/https://doi.org/10.1 ... 014.979273#

Re: Digital Humanities, Mathematical Modelling of Cavalry Charge

Posted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 4:27 pm
by TheGrayMouser
Not really impressed with the article. No one at the battle had access to whatever computer model that allegedly determined “ the best” course of action which apparently is limited to three choices...( the article is quiet about what they actually used, could be the total war engine for all we know ). Also, to not even mention Captain Nolan and his role in the disaster seems odd. To the “researchers”: do you even wargame, bro?

Re: Digital Humanities, Mathematical Modelling of Cavalry Charge

Posted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 5:49 pm
by NikiforosFokas
Just here to tell God bless Libgen and Sci-hub.
Thanks for the info uneducated.
To the TheGrayMouser: Oh yes I know some who are both researchers and wargamers :)