Painting Horses

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stancolleymore
Senior Corporal - Ju 87G
Senior Corporal - Ju 87G
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:55 pm

Painting Horses

Post by stancolleymore » Sat May 12, 2018 9:23 am

Hi
Can anybody recommend a SIMPLE guide to painting 15mm horses using Vallejo paints?

Thanks in advance.

vexillia

Re: Painting Horses

Post by vexillia » Sat May 12, 2018 12:13 pm

I don't have guide exactly but lots of people found this useful - https://blog.vexillia.me.uk/2008/06/horse-colours.html

stancolleymore
Senior Corporal - Ju 87G
Senior Corporal - Ju 87G
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:55 pm

Re: Painting Horses

Post by stancolleymore » Sat May 12, 2018 1:32 pm

vexillia wrote:I don't have guide exactly but lots of people found this useful - https://blog.vexillia.me.uk/2008/06/horse-colours.html
Martin

Thanks for this. It is an interesting article and I followed the link to their site which has loads of things to look at.

I was hoping for actual Vallejo paint colours and instructions but thanks anyway.

Bob

ChrisTofalos
Sergeant - 7.5 cm FK 16 nA
Sergeant - 7.5 cm FK 16 nA
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 5:18 pm

Re: Painting Horses

Post by ChrisTofalos » Sun May 13, 2018 3:52 pm

I used to do painting (in exchange for figures) for the late, great Peter Gilder. He showed me an amazing technique he used for horses. It was in the days when acrylics weren't so popular and most used oil-based Humbrol enamels.

It involved liberally painting the horse's body with oil paint. Oil paints take a lot longer to dry and this allowed the surface to be worked on with a piece of scrap sponge, wiping off paint from the hind quarters, head and legs. It produced an instant shaded effect, with the highlights, still covered with a thin layer of paint, showing through. You then painted the legs, mane and tail and allowed it to dry. Finally, You dry-brushed highlights to the mane and tail and painted in the white feet and flash on the face. It's a quick and highly effective method but, try as I might, I've never been able replicate it with acrylics, even when using drying time extender; it just dries too quickly and can't be worked on.

The best compromise I've come up with is to paint the horse then give it a wash of black. When dry you can use the base colour to re-introduce some highlights. Not as good as Peter's method but it does look quite good...

Chris

stancolleymore
Senior Corporal - Ju 87G
Senior Corporal - Ju 87G
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:55 pm

Re: Painting Horses

Post by stancolleymore » Sun May 13, 2018 5:19 pm

ChrisTofalos wrote:I used to do painting (in exchange for figures) for the late, great Peter Gilder. He showed me an amazing technique he used for horses. It was in the days when acrylics weren't so popular and most used oil-based Humbrol enamels.

It involved liberally painting the horse's body with oil paint. Oil paints take a lot longer to dry and this allowed the surface to be worked on with a piece of scrap sponge, wiping off paint from the hind quarters, head and legs. It produced an instant shaded effect, with the highlights, still covered with a thin layer of paint, showing through. You then painted the legs, mane and tail and allowed it to dry. Finally, You dry-brushed highlights to the mane and tail and painted in the white feet and flash on the face. It's a quick and highly effective method but, try as I might, I've never been able replicate it with acrylics, even when using drying time extender; it just dries too quickly and can't be worked on.

The best compromise I've come up with is to paint the horse then give it a wash of black. When dry you can use the base colour to re-introduce some highlights. Not as good as Peter's method but it does look quite good...

Chris
Chris thanks!!

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