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Which point is exciting for you on DF?

Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 2:36 am
by Muraoka-san
Hello,

I really enjoy Moscow and Bulge.
On the other hand, I do not see what makes me exciting on Desert Fox.
I understand DF is less dynamic than others, but it does not leave me the feeling of "fun".
Is it because of how I play (or my strategy) is wrong?
Or maybe because of Desert Fox ( but I think there is still a dynamism of a seesaw game there...)
Or the rule is too complicated than others?

Actually I would like to know how other players feels and possibly comments on playing this game.

Thank you.
--
Yoshitaka MURAOKA

Re: Which point is exciting for you on DF?

Posted: Tue Oct 07, 2014 12:55 am
by spacerumsfeld
The point I find most exciting in Desert Fox is the point at which the German is in a position to exit units from the map. It is extremely hard to get six units off, but I almost always try it, because the alternative is not so exciting, as you mention.

Of the three Shenandoah games, Bulge and Desert Fox share the ability for the Axis to "turtle," in which they make no attempt to exit and simply sit back and wait to accumulate enough victory points to eke out a win. While Moscow has a sort of "wait for VP" strategy as an endpoint, it requires an initial sustained attack in order to capture three or more +1 victory spaces, and to hold these as long as possible for the VP. Only then can the Axis sit back. If this attack fails, the Axis will be exposed. Bulge and Desert Fox, however, allow the Axis to never really flex their muscles, instead taking up an easily reached intermediate line and then watching the Allies bash their heads against it while the VP timer runs out. There is little risk, in other words.

For these reasons, I almost never turtle in either Bulge or Desert Fox, because I agree that this is not exciting. I have lost my share of Desert Fox games pushing for the map edge with the second, third, and fourth exiting units, having the Commonwealth finally shut the door, and being too weak as a result to make an orderly withdrawal and being cut to pieces. But somehow I find this more "fun" than the turtle strategy where I just mine as heavily as the Commonwealth player lets me (although I am running into more and more Commonwealth players who almost never refit in order to deny the Axis their mines - this leads to a very weak Commonwealth and interesting results) and then wait for enough VP to start withdrawing.

So I think if you play Desert Fox a certain way, it can be less exciting than Bulge or Moscow, or at least less exciting than a Bulge game played as "Meuse or bust." (I tend to play Meuse-or-bust in Bulge as well.) It's the wild swings and the back and forth that makes these games enjoyable for me. And the fact that turtling can happen just shows you that even with such talented designers, the historical situation can lead to game situations that favor less dynamic results.

Re: Which point is exciting for you on DF?

Posted: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:49 pm
by BigM
Interesting view point you both make. DF is much harder to play, rules are more complicated but once mastered I find DF more compelling than Moscow and Bulge. Playing the German side in DF though, one mistake at wrong place and time and the German attempt at orderly retreat transforms itself in a long series of defeats until CW troops kill the last one. But if victory smiles at you I agree exiting six German units into Egypt is a great feeling.
Playing others online is great fun, especially if you have a regular adversary.
Best to all,
BigM

Re: Which point is exciting for you on DF?

Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 4:47 am
by Muraoka-san
Thank you very much for your insight.
I need much more time to learn how to PLAY.

HST, I do not know hey, but my DF does not boot up. It crashes as I start the game.... sad... :|

Which point is exciting for you on DF

Posted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:28 pm
by Kavomatovlbat
Thanks for trying to get back in touch.

I hope you are able to make contact.

By the way, what Unit was he in?

That may help jar someones memory.